There’s a bug on my computer!

I had an urge to fold a ‘bug’ after the various bug incidents at the office recently. This particular model is at least 13 years old, I found it at Joseph Wu’s excellent origami diagram repository. Kudos to Marc Vigo Anglada for creating such an amazing piece. It’s pretty life-like and relatively easy to fold. I folded it in about 2 hours but most of the time was in figuring out the diagram since it has a few ‘bugs’ (or I could have interpreted it the wrong way). Once this is done I tried another one and did it in about 30 mins. The hardest part is in folding the legs initially, which can be quite tedious. This model is folded from a single piece of A4 sized photocopy paper.

Here are some snapshots of the ‘bug’:

beetle_computer01.png

There’s a bug on my MacBook Pro!

beetle04.png

Top view of the bug

beetle02.png

Side view of the bug

beetle01.png

Another way of looking at the bug.

beetle03.png

The underbelly of the bug.

The proof of its life-likeness was when I showed it to my wife and she glared at me. I think she liked the Kawasaki rose better :)

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There’s a bug on my computer!

I had an urge to fold a ‘bug’ after the various bug incidents at the office recently. This particular model is at least 13 years old, I found it at Joseph Wu’s excellent origami diagram repository. Kudos to Marc Vigo Anglada for creating such an amazing piece. It’s pretty life-like and relatively easy to fold. I folded it in about 2 hours but most of the time was in figuring out the diagram since it has a few ‘bugs’ (or I could have interpreted it the wrong way). Once this is done I tried another one and did it in about 30 mins. The hardest part is in folding the legs initially, which can be quite tedious. This model is folded from a single piece of A4 sized photocopy paper.

Here are some snapshots of the ‘bug’:

beetle_computer01.png

There’s a bug on my MacBook Pro!

beetle04.png

Top view of the bug

beetle02.png

Side view of the bug

beetle01.png

Another way of looking at the bug.

beetle03.png

The underbelly of the bug.

The proof of its life-likeness was when I showed it to my wife and she glared at me. I think she liked the Kawasaki rose better :)

Glowing Kawasaki Rose

This is an ‘enhanced’ version of the Kawasaki’s Rose I did a couple of months ago. The major difference between this version and the previous one is, of course, that it glows. Check it out below.

Glowing rose - sideview

Glowing rose from side view.

Glowing rose - front view

Glowing rose from top view.

Quite a few people asked me for additional tips on how I created the previous rose so I took a few snapshots of the work in progress.

Front tip of glowing rose bulb

The glowing tip is really just a simple small light bulb I salvaged from an old toy torchlight. I took cable-tying wires and stripped off both ends to expose the naked wire, then stuff one end into the bulb holder. Since the stem is made of stiff wire, the stem itself conducts the small current it takes to light up the rose.

Glowing rose stem wrapped with wires

I didn’t have any soldering tools so I took a glue gun and stuck the stem to the end of the light bulb. Then I wrapped the wire around the stem.

Back end of rose (prototype)

The tail end of the stem is attached to a simple battery holder.

The rose itself is made from an old plastic bag, which allows it to glow nicely. You can try other materials if you like but if you want it to glow properly you should use something that is not too thick. I used some green-colored paper and made the leaf and petal base shapes (it’s not really origami, I know but most origami doesn’t glow either) and used my glue gun to stick them on. The stem, as before, is wrapped with crepe paper.

It’s still work in progress as I intend to make a nice vase as well as attaching a proper switch to the base.

Materials:

  1. Old red-colored plastic bag – free
  2. Stiff wire – 50 cents
  3. Green paper – 50 cents
  4. Green crepe paper -50 cents
  5. Battery holder – $1.20
  6. Batteries – $1.00
  7. Look on my wife’s face as I gave her a glowing rose on our 10th anniversary Valentine Day – Priceless.

Conch shell

This conch shell is from Toshikazu Kawasaki again, from the book Origami for the Connoisseur by Kunihiko Kasahara and Toshie Takahama. It is folded from a single piece of square paper, from an A4 sized copier paper (recycled from old printouts of Java articles). It took me about 30 minutes to fold this. It’s not too difficult though it looks a bit daunting at first. Thanks to Pierre for lending me the book! I need to get a copy of it for myself :(
This is the top view.

shell_top.png

This is the almost-side view.

shell_side.png

Voyer’s Cat

This is the folding of a cat originally folded by J. Anibal Voyer Iniesta. I folded it in about 30 minutes with a single piece of square paper originating from an A4 sized sheet of paper. I couldn’t quite get the face properly though.
Voyer's Cat

Origami is quite relaxing actually — it helps to keep the hand and the mind busy on a single task, which comes to think about it, is quite a lot like meditation. After the folding you get a sense of achievement of creating something that looks like nothing of the original.

Voyer’s Cat

This is the folding of a cat originally folded by J. Anibal Voyer Iniesta. I folded it in about 30 minutes with a single piece of square paper originating from an A4 sized sheet of paper. I couldn’t quite get the face properly though.
Voyer's Cat

Origami is quite relaxing actually — it helps to keep the hand and the mind busy on a single task, which comes to think about it, is quite a lot like meditation. After the folding you get a sense of achievement of creating something that looks like nothing of the original.

Kawasaki’s rose

This Kawasaki’s Rose is folded from a single piece of paper without cutting. The stem is made from steel wire, wrapped in crepe paper. The single leaf is also folded without cutting. I folded the rose in about 30 mins and the leaf in about 10 mins. The rest of the stem and the assembly took me about another 20 mins so all in all the whole rose took about 1 hour to make.

Kawasaki’s rose is a famous origami piece by Toshikazu Kawasaki, while the stem and the single rose leaf is my little variation of the theme. Most Kawasaki’s roses I have seen use this base instead. Some also uses a vase, but I thought it looks better and more realistic this way.